Lounging around L1: DSCOVR spacecraft has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away, as seen on July 6, 2015. Credit: NASA

Lounging around L1: DSCOVR spacecraft has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away, as seen on July 6, 2015.
Credit: NASA

 

 

 

On June 7, 2015 the Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, made it to its final destination when it entered orbit around the Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1), some 1.5 million kilometers sunward of the Earth.

Credit: NESDIS/NOAA

Credit: NESDIS/NOAA

 

A NASA camera on DSCOVR has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away, as seen on July 6, 2015. The scientific camera used is NASA’s Earth Polychromatic Imaging Camera (EPIC) aboard the spacecraft.

 

DSCOVR-Logo_NOAA_NASA_USAF

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s an informative story on DSCOVR and the future use of Lagrange points by Buzz Aldrin, published on NASA’s web site:

https://blogs.nasa.gov/leadership/2015/07/20/dscovrs-first-light-on-the-future/

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