Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) surveyed the scene as evidenced by this July 5, 2015, Sol 1035 photo. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) surveyed the scene as evidenced by this July 5, 2015, Sol 1035 photo.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

 

 

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover completed a drive of 28-feet (8.5 meters) on Sol 1044. That drive left the machinery in a relatively flat and smooth area that is suitable for imaging of the wheels.

 

 

 

“Wheel imaging is done periodically to assess wear, and it’s time to acquire new data,” reports Ken Herkenhoff of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona. A Sol 1046 inspection is using the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, and other cameras.

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on July 16, 2015, Sol 1046. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, on July 16, 2015, Sol 1046.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Up-close Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) image from Sol 1032. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Up-close Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) image from Sol 1032.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

After the wheel imaging is complete, the usual post-drive images will be acquired, along with additional Navcam stereo images of an outcrop and a Mastcam observation of the Sun.

A nearby outcrop called “Mustang” was selected for ChemCam and Mastcam observations.

On Sol 1047, among Curiosity camera duties, is a search for dust devils, Herkenhoff adds.

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