Curiosity Mastcam Right image taken on Sol 1464 September 18, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity Mastcam Right image taken on Sol 1464 September 18, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

 

Now in Sol 1466, NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover accomplished a successful second attempt to drill into Quela – but there was a timing issue during sample manipulation with the Collection and Handling for Interior Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA).

That timing issue resulted in premature halting of the Sol 1465 sequence.

Image from Curiosity's ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager, taken on Sol 1466, September 20, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Image from Curiosity’s ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager, taken on Sol 1466, September 20, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Sieve new sample

The plan for Sol 1466 is to pick up where Curiosity stopped and sieve the new sample, dump the un-sieved fraction, and drop some of the sieved sample into the Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin).

But first, the Chemistry & Camera instrument (ChemCam) is set to acquire passive spectra of the Quela drill tailings and use its laser to measure the chemistry of the wall of the new drill hole and of bedrock targets “Camaxilo” and “Okakarara.”

Dirty deed! Drilling into Mars. Image of the working end of drill taken by Curiosity's Mastcam Left imager, taken on Sol 1464, September 18, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Dirty deed! Drilling into Mars. Image of the working end of drill taken by Curiosity’s Mastcam Left imager, taken on Sol 1464, September 18, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Right Mastcam images of these targets are also planned, reports Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

 

 

 

Drill hole angles

Herkenhoff adds that, after sunset, the rover’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) will use its LEDs to take images of the drill hole from various angles and of the CheMin inlet to confirm that the sample was successfully delivered.

Lastly, the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) will be placed over the drill tailings for an overnight integration, Herkenhoff reports.

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