Curiosity Front Hazcam Left B image taken on Sol 2347, March 14, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover is now performing Sol 2349 tasks.

“Curiosity is back to work after another hiatus due to a computer reset,” reports Scott Guzewich, an atmospheric scientist at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland

“These sorts of resets do happen from time to time for operating spacecraft and we’re able to enjoy the benefit of two computers to operate the rover by switching to the other one when needed.”

Curiosity Navcam Left B photo taken on Sol 2347, March 14, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

As you’d expect, Guzewich adds, the view from the rover hasn’t changed much lately and the robot’s arm is still poised over the bedrock target “Fife.”

Curiosity Navcam Left B photo taken on Sol 2347, March 14, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Ripple fields

A recent plan has Curiosity performing an Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) integration on Fife before continuing to examine the nearby bedrock including a pebble called “Schiehallion.”

The rover’s Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) and Mastcam will also both study some dune and ripple fields nearby called “Motherwell.”

“Our atmospheric monitoring is also behind schedule,” Guzewich notes, so the plan called for trying to make up for lost time with three measurements of atmospheric opacity in these next two sols, two searches for dust devils, and a Mastcam sky survey where scientists examine the properties of dust particles suspended in the air.

Curiosity ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager photo taken on Sol 2347, March 14, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Curiosity Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) photo obtained on Sol 2339, March 6, 2019. MAHLI is located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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