Curiosity Front Hazard Avoidance Camera Left B image taken on Sol 3033, February 16, 2021.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover is now wrapping up Sol 3033 tasks.

The Mars robot has been staying put and feasting on some bonus science, reports Sean Czarnecki, a planetary geologist at Arizona State University in Tempe.

Curiosity Chemistry & Camera Remote Micro-Imager (RMI) photo acquired on Sol 3032, February 15, 2021.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

“Our goal remains to traverse away from the rocks we have determined are clay-rich and toward the overlying sulfate-rich rocks uphill,” Czarnecki explains. “But for the current plan, the team decided to stay at this location a little longer and get a better taste of what the rocks here have to offer before executing a longer drive toward the sulfate strata in the following plan.”

Curiosity Left B Navigation Camera photo taken on Sol 3032, February 15, 2021.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Science buffet

The rover has been carrying out standard activities making Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN), Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) and Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) observations, as well as Navcam and Mastcam monitoring of the atmosphere and a look for dust devils.

Curiosity Left B Navigation Camera photo taken on Sol 3032, February 15, 2021.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity’s “science buffet” includes taking Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) and Mastcam images of targets “Beauregard” and “Sorges,” “which have interesting dark inclusion features that have been seen recently and these observations will help the team understand them better,” Czarnecki adds.

Mastcam is also imaging the bedrock target “Labraud” and sand target “Fleurac.” Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instruments are hungry for science as well, “so we will get MAHLI images and APXS analysis of the brushed target “Limeyrat,” Czarnecki concludes.

Curiosity Left B Navigation Camera photo taken on Sol 3032, February 15, 2021.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Leave a Reply