Alcohol in Space – Past, Present and Future by Chris Carberry, McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, Jefferson, North Carolina; 2019; softcover, 217 pages, $29.95.

Just in time for cheering on the holidays!

This book is a genuine treasure, focused on the making and consumption of alcohol throughout history…with a new upshot – the growing role of alcohol production in low Earth orbit (LEO) — or should it be libation Earth orbit? — and beyond!

Featuring 7 chapters, this volume includes a brief history of alcohol and society, booze in science fiction, retro-flections of drinking in space, space beer, wine, whiskey and innovation, as well as human settlement and farming in space.

Chris Carberry is the CEO of the non-profit organization Explore Mars, Inc. and has done a superb amount of research in writing this book, one that is chock-full of non-teetotale tales. “Yes, to drink where no one has drunk before,” he writes, pointing to the space-born Romulan ale, a special, high-speed sauce of Star Trek.

“As commercial space activities accelerate, this subject (both positive and negative aspects) will become more and more relevant as private individuals bring human customs, vices, and ceremonies into space,” the author writes in the book’s preface.

A foreword written by Andy Weir, author of The Martian and other science fiction works, offers his own cocktail considerations of the topic at hand. “One of the more common questions I get asked by fans of The Martian is, ‘Could Mark Watney have made vodka from some of those potatoes?’ Who knows what the future holds? Well, maybe Chris Carberry does. Kick back, grab your drink of choice, and enjoy this book about two of my favorite subjects.”

The author’s writing style is witty and informative. “It may not be the Restaurant at the End of the Universe,” Carberry explains, but Club 90 South in Antarctica might double for what an early Mars saloon may look and feel like.

Alcohol is present naturally in space, Carberry points out, and even an “intoxicating cloud” of alcohol tagged W3(OH). “Clearly, humanity will not be tapping these massive supplies of alcohol that are scattered around the universe anytime soon. If we want to acquire sustainable supplies of alcohol for our own use in space, we will either need to manufacture it in space or ship it from Earth at great cost.”

Lastly, there’s an exceptional set of chapter notes that demonstrates the rigor the author has taken to document the data contained in this volume.

Alcohol in Space – Past, Present and Future is an intoxicating book, so imbibe and behold…but read responsibly.

For more information on this book, go to:

https://mcfarlandbooks.com/product/alcohol-in-space/

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