Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

There’s a new sky-high idea floating about concerning the Games of the XXXII Olympiad in Tokyo.

Perhaps the opening ceremony in that 2020 event will feature “Sky Canvas” – artificial shooting stars launched from a satellite.

Credit: Games of the XXXII Olympiad

Credit: Games of the XXXII Olympiad

 

Lab setting

The shooting stars on demand idea stems from Tokyo-based ALE Co., Ltd.

“In a laboratory setting, our artificial shooting stars have already achieved an apparent magnitude of -1. Even Sirius, the brightest star that can be observed in the night sky, has an apparent magnitude of -1.5,” the firm’s website explains. “There’s no doubt that artificial shooting stars by ALE can clearly be seen anywhere, even in the city.”

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Color me bright

Turning an artificial shooting star into different colors is done by loading a satellite with various materials, thereby turning shooting stars into any color.

“Our shooting star travels slower and longer across the sky than a natural shooting star. This makes it possible for more people to enjoy the spectacle for a longer period of time,” adds the ALE website.

“In the ‘Sky Canvas Project,’ numerous source particles can be continuously emitted, which allows us to create not only a single shooting star, but a real meteor shower.”

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Coming to a sky near you?

As noted in the company’s business plan, the Sky Canvas service can provide a shooting star in all parts of the world. The ground viewing area is 400 times wider than a fireworks bursting at an altitude of 1,640 feet (500 meters).

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

When the service is initially offered, ALE planners say there will be limitations on locations of the shooting stars. However, they may plan to launch multiple satellites in orbit. With more satellites, shooting stars can be freely created in different directions and locations.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

Credit: ALE Co., Ltd.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shooting stars

Any worry about artificial meteors hitting another space object?

The firm has developed software that calculates the probability of their particles colliding with other objects.

“The particles will not be discharged unless safety is confirmed. In a rare case that there remains a question in safety based on the simulation, we will abort the discharge to prevent a possible disaster,” the website explains.

A SkyCanvas Promotion Movie is available here:

 

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