Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1359, June 2, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1359, June 2, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The plan for NASA’s Curiosity rover on the Red Planet is to drill into the targeted “Oudam” bedrock.

Now in Sol 1361, Curiosity is to perform a full stint of drilling, followed by taking Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) and Mastcam images of the new hole.

Drill sample transfer

Explains Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona, after drilling the rover will rest until Sol 1362, when the drill sample will be transferred to the scoop for Mastcam imaging and sieved.

Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) was used to image this vein on Sol 1360, June 3, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) was used to image this vein on Sol 1360, June 3, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

A fine-grained portion of the sample is slated then to be dropped into the rover’s Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin) for an overnight mineralogical analysis.

Vein observation

Following the CheMin data read out of the instrument on Sol 1363, Herkenhoff adds, Curiosity’s Mastcam will take a multispectral set of images of the drill tailings and a Right Mastcam mosaic of an outcrop southeast of the rover.

Curiosity rover’s ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager took this image on Sol 1360, June 3, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

Curiosity rover’s ChemCam Remote Micro-Imager took this image on Sol 1360, June 3, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/LANL

In addition, the robot’s Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) and Mastcam will observe a vein target named “Onganja” and a bedrock target dubbed “Ongeama.”

Curiosity’s Navcam will search for dust devils as part of another busy weekend, Herkenhoff concludes.

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