Graphic above by Danielle Futselaar is the famous Drake Equation, representing the full spectrum of science undertaken at the SETI Institute. Wherever you are on Earth, the Drake Equation represents all explorations of our lives, and life beyond our home planet. Credit: Danielle Futselaar/SETI Institute

Graphic above by Danielle Futselaar is the famous Drake Equation, representing the full spectrum of science undertaken at the SETI Institute. Wherever you are on Earth, the Drake Equation represents all explorations of our lives, and life beyond our home planet.
Credit: Danielle Futselaar/SETI Institute

There are new developments in the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, or SETI for short.

In the SETI business, two game-changers are notable, explains Jill Tarter, Director, Center of SETI Research and the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI.

Jill Tarter, Director, Center of SETI Research and the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI. Credit: SETI Institute

Jill Tarter, Director, Center of SETI Research and the Bernard M. Oliver Chair for SETI.
Credit: SETI Institute

“I’ve spent my professional life searching for alien life. Over the span of my career, I’ve seen our equipment change dramatically, from custom built microchips and signal processors we had to design and build ourselves to the enterprise servers that run our search algorithms today,” Tarter explains in a newly issued communiqué from SETI central.

Those two game-changers are:

  • The discovery that there are more planets than stars in the Milky Way; and
  • The evidence of life thriving in the most extreme environments here on Earth.

More bio-friendly

“The universe appears to be a lot more bio-friendly to life than we once thought,” Tarter observes. “Now we want to find out if any of that potentially habitable real estate is actually inhabited.”

Giving a listen for other star folk, the Allen Telescope Array in California. Credit: SETI Institute

Giving a listen for other star folk, the Allen Telescope Array in California.
Credit: SETI Institute

Tarter underscores that SETI is a unique exploratory science that began in 1984 in partnership with NASA.

“Since 1993, however, we’ve had to rely on private sources of funding to continue this search that costs us $590,000 annually to cover staff and basic equipment. We need to raise $70,000 this summer to stay on track,” Tarter explains.

Campaign for SETI

The SETI Institute’s Allen Telescope Array scans the sky for signals 365 days a year.

Credit: SETI Institute

Credit: SETI Institute

“It is the only facility that searches for SETI signals in near real time and thus it can better filter out interference from our own technologies,” Tarter points out. “Our tools are improving daily, but we need your help to keep them scanning the skies,” Tarter adds, “because it’s a pretty big search out there with so many exoplanets having the potential for life, and so many different types of signals to examine.”

To learn more about the campaign, go to:

https://teamseti.org/vid-donate-2?erid=1373805&trid=f81b6d67-4b24-4cc7-a7eb-763a917bfaa6

Also, tune into this informative You Tube video on SETI at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPy4goTwoX0

One Response to “SETI: Game-Changing Discovery and Evidence”

  • has the SETI team ever examined photographs downlinked from the NASA MER program and come to any conclusions about fossils and artifacts which are littering the Martian surface?

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