This image was taken by Curiosity's Mastcam: Right on May 27, 2015 on Sol 997.   Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

This image was taken by Curiosity’s Mastcam: Right on May 27, 2015 on Sol 997.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover has wheeled into position to investigate several different rock units in Marias Pass.

The robot is to use a number of instruments on its arm, notes Lauren Edgar, Mars Science Laboratory science team member and research geologist at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Curiosity's Navcam: Left B shows outstretched and instrumented robot arm on May 28, 2015, Sol 998.    Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity’s Navcam: Left B shows outstretched and instrumented robot arm on May 28, 2015, Sol 998.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

“We are parked in front of a beautiful outcrop that shows the contact between the underlying Pahrump unit and the overlying Stimson unit,” she explains.

Sounds of silence

Curiosity will be parked for the next few weeks, Edgar adds. That’s due to the upcoming solar conjunction. Mars will be on the opposite side of the Sun from the Earth. That alignment means there will be no contact with the rover for most of June.

Similarly, NASA’s Opportunity Mars rover will enter radio silence.

 

The rover’s recent drive of 8 feet (2.5) meters brings its total odometry to 34,774 feet (10,599 meters) or roughly 7 miles since the Mars machinery landed in August 2012.

This map shows the route driven by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity through the 991 Martian day, or Sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (May, 21, 2015). Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up. The scale bar is 1 kilometer ( roughly 0.62 mile). From Sol 990 to Sol 991, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 61.85 feet (18.85 meters). The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.   Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

This map shows the route driven by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity through the 991 Martian day, or Sol, of the rover’s mission on Mars (May, 21, 2015).
Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up. The scale bar is 1 kilometer ( roughly 0.62 mile). From Sol 990 to Sol 991, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 61.85 feet (18.85 meters).
The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

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