Curiosity Mars rover took this Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) image on August 26, 2015, Sol 1085.  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity Mars rover took this Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) image on August 26, 2015, Sol 1085.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

Handlers of the Curiosity rover report a further march of the Mars machinery – a nearly 128-feet (39-meter) drive on Sol 1085.

That drive has left the rover in another “target-rich area,” reports Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) observations were made on the brighter parts of an outcrop just south of the rover. The targets for ChemCam and Mastcam observations were named “Fitzpatrick,” “Keith,” and “Fred and George Creek.”

Mastcam was also to acquire 2 mosaics before the rover drives away today on Sol 1087.

Daily variations

Herkenhoff notes that planned for Sol 1088 are early-morning Mastcam and Navcam images of the Sun and sky.

MAHLI image taken August 4, 2015, Sol 1064 of inlet funnel of the Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

MAHLI image taken August 4, 2015, Sol 1064 of inlet funnel of the Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin).
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

“Similar observations are planned around noon that sol, to measure daily variations in atmospheric dust and clouds,” Herkenhoff adds.

Lastly, the inlet funnel of the Chemistry & Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction/X-Ray Fluorescence Instrument (CheMin) is slated to be vibrated in an attempt to remove a particle from the screen over the funnel, Herkenhoff points out.

As always, the dates of planned rover activities are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

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