The arrow tip marks the planned touchdown point of Hayabusa2.
Credit: JAXA, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Chiba Institute of Technology, Meiji University, University of Aizu, AIST

 

 

Japan’s Hayabusa2 project to explore asteroid Ryugu is approaching the time for touchdown this Friday.

Northern hemisphere of asteroid Ryugu fills most of the image. The tip of the arrow indicates the intended touchdown point.
Credit: JAXA, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Chiba Institute of Technology, Meiji University, University of Aizu, AIST

White dot at the arrow tip is the previously deployed target marker.
Credit: JAXA, University of Tokyo, Kochi University, Rikkyo University, Nagoya University, Chiba Institute of Technology, Meiji University, University of Aizu, AIST

The team has just released images from last month’s BOX-B operation – where the spacecraft’s distance from the surface is kept at about 12 miles (20 kilometers).

That operation also has Hayabusa2 move in a north-south and east-west direction to observe the space rock from different angles.

 

 

 

Northern hemisphere

This was the first time the team captured images of the northern hemisphere of Ryugu. By acquiring data on the equatorial region of Ryugu, the southern and northern hemisphere an accurate global shape model for Ryugu can be created.

Leave a Reply