NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, captured this image on September 26, 2015, Sol 1116. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, captured this image on September 26, 2015, Sol 1116.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Today is Sol 1119 for the Mars Curiosity rover mission.

Over last weekend, a mini-drill has cleared the way for drilling “Big Sky.”

“The hope is that this location will provide a good sample of the ‘typical’ rock in the area to compare with some of the interesting alteration we’ve been seeing,” reports Ryan Anderson, a planetary scientist at the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Roughly an hour later, this image was taken by Mars rover Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Roughly an hour later, this image was taken by Mars rover Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI).
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Along with the drilling, there will be a number of Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) documentation images taken of the hole from varying distances and angles.

Anderson reports that on sol 1120, the rover’s Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) will target the drill tailings, along with the targets “Devil’s Basin,” “Livingston,” and “Deadwood.”

Curiosity’s Mastcam is slated to document the drill hole and all of the ChemCam targets. Then, later in the day on sol 1120, Navcam and Mastcam both have some atmospheric observations.

The robot’s Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN), the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD), and the Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) are scheduled to perform routine monitoring, Anderson adds.

Actual dates of planned rover activities are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the Martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

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