Curiosity’s Front Hazcam Right B image taken on Sol 1358, June 1, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity’s Front Hazcam Right B image taken on Sol 1358, June 1, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars is busy at work, carrying out Sol 1359 duties.

According to Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona, a the remaining “Okoruso drill sample” was successfully dumped onto the ground on Sol 1358. So the robot is ready for a new drill sample, he notes.

In preparation for that job, the Sol 1359 plan includes an arm preload test on “Oudam,” the next drill target, and cleaning out the sample-handling mechanisms of the rover’s Collection and Handling for In-Situ Martian Rock Analysis (CHIMRA) device.

Images of CHIMRA are to verify that everything is clean, Herkenhoff adds.

Dump pile photos

Before all the arm activities, the Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) and Mastcam will observe the Okoruso dump pile and a bedrock target named “Otjosondu,” Herkenhoff explains.

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on June 1, 2016, Sol 1358. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, on June 1, 2016, Sol 1358.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

The robot’s Left Mastcam is also slated to acquire a 5×2 mosaic of the “Fraktuur Dorp” area and extend the “Hartmann’s Valley” mosaic.

Late in the afternoon, when lighting will be better, Curiosity’s Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) is to acquire images of bedrock target “Onguati” and a full suite of images of the dump pile.

The robot’s Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) is scheduled to be placed on the dump pile for an overnight data collection stint, Herkenhoff points out.

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