NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on June 17, 2016, Sol 1373. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, on June 17, 2016, Sol 1373.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

 

NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars is now busily on task during Sol 1374.

A few Sols ago, the robot made a drive of 105 feet (32-meters), executing the maneuver exactly as planned.

That drive has given the rover a good view of the path toward the south, explains Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Another drive of roughly the same distance was planned for Sol 1373, after some rover remote science observations.

 

Path ahead

Curiosity Mastcam Left image taken on Sol 1371, June 14, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity Mastcam Left image taken on Sol 1371, June 14, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity’s Mastcam is imaging the path ahead through all spectral filters, then the robot’s Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) and the Right Mastcam will observe Stimson bedrock targets “Sesfontein” and “Swartbooisdrif,” reports Herkenhoff.

On Sol 1374, there is a planned use of software to autonomously acquire another ChemCam observation and the Left Mastcam will take a 3×2 mosaic of the same area.

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1373, June 17, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1373, June 17, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Dates of planned rover activities are subject to change due to a variety of factors, including communication relays and rover status.

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1373, June 17, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1373, June 17, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

New map

A new map has been issued that depicts the Curiosity rover’s location for Sol 1373.

This map shows the route driven by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity through the 1373 Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s mission on Mars (June, 17, 2016).

Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up.

From Sol 1371 to Sol 1373, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 98.09 feet (29.90 meters). Since touching down in Bradbury Landing in August 2012, Curiosity has driven 8.07 miles (12.98 kilometers).

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

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