Curiosity Left Navigation Camera B image taken on Sol 2559, October 18, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover is now performing Sol 2560 duties.

Curiosity Left Navigation Camera B image taken on Sol 2559, October 18, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Reports Susanne Schwenzer, a planetary geologist at The Open University, Milton Keynes, U.K., due to no reception of “decisional data” from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars rover teams decided to make the best use of the time and energy available using the untargeted investigations available to them.

Curiosity Left Navigation Camera B image taken on Sol 2559, October 18, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The rover’s Mastcam has been busy with a 360 panorama, “which will give context to all our past and future investigations in the area,” Schwenzer explains.

“In addition to the daytime ground-based observation, Mastcam wakes up in the dark to do an astronomical investigation of Phobos, followed – in daytime – by some calibration activities.”

Curiosity Left Navigation Camera B image acquired on Sol 2559, October 18, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Left Navigation Camera B image taken on Sol 2559, October 18, 2019.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Busy weekend

Schwenzer adds that it’s not only Mastcam that will be busy over the weekend.

Curiosity’s Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) has two observations to investigate three targets.

ChemCam can use Autonomous Exploration for Gathering Increased Science (AEGIS), an image processing routine to find its own targets.

 

 

 

“It will be looking for one target in the workspace, and two to the side of the rover,” Schwenzer concludes. “We are now all looking forward to data from 5 sols of Curiosity activities – stay tuned!”

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