Curiosity Mastcam Right image taken on Sol 1407, July 21, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity Mastcam Right image taken on Sol 1407, July 21, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Now in Sol 1409, NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover has focused its observations on a blocky deposit dubbed “Bimbe.”

Other targets over the weekend that are under scrutiny with rover instruments are “Seeis”, “Seeheim”, “Wilhelmstal”, “Oranjemund” , “Funda” and “Zambezi”.

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1407, July 21, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Left B image taken on Sol 1407, July 21, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Drive planned

On Sol 1410, the rover’s Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) has an observation of the target “Mariental” with support from Mastcam.

“After that, we drive and do the usual post-drive imaging,” explains Ryan Anderson, a planetary scientist at the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Rover deck deposits

On Sol 1411, the rover’s Mastcam has an observation of the rover deck to watch for dust and sand that end up on top of the rover, Anderson adds.

Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on July 21, 2016, Sol 1407. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Wheel atop rock. Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on July 21, 2016, Sol 1407.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Dates of planned rover activities are subject to change due to a variety of factors related to the martian environment, communication relays and rover status.

New map

Meanwhile, a new map has been released showing the route driven by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity through the 1405 Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s mission on Mars (July, 20, 2016).

Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up.

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on July 21, 2016, Sol 1407. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on July 21, 2016, Sol 1407.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

From Sol 1401 to Sol 1405, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 89.50 feet (27.28 meters).

Since touching down in Bradbury Landing in August 2012, Curiosity has driven 8.31 miles (13.37 kilometers).

Leave a Reply

Griffith Observatory Event