Curiosity Navcam Right B image taken on Sol 1284, March 17, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Right B image taken on Sol 1284, March 17, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover is still working its way across the Naukluft Plateau and is now into Sol 1285.

On Sol 1284 Curiosity drove roughly 88 feet (27 meters, which brings the rover’s total traverse distance to roughly 8 miles (12,549 meters) reports Lauren Edgar, a research geologist at the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

In the morning, Curiosity was slated to use its Mastcam and Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) on targets named “Mulden” and “Koigab” to characterize the bedrock that the robot has been driving over. A Mastcam mosaic was on the plan to investigate the local stratigraphy.

“Then Curiosity will continue driving towards the northwest, and will take post-drive imaging to prepare for contact science over the weekend,” Edgar adds.

Curiosity Rover's Location for Sol 1284 This map shows the route driven by NASA's Mars rover Curiosity through the 1284 Martian day, or sol, of the rover's mission on Mars (March, 17, 2016). Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up. From Sol 1283 to Sol 1284, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 79.25 feet (24.16 meters). The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.  Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Curiosity Rover’s Location for Sol 1284
This map shows the route driven by NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity through the 1284 Martian day, or sol, of the rover’s mission on Mars (March, 17, 2016).
Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up. From Sol 1283 to Sol 1284, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 79.25 feet (24.16 meters).
The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Early the next morning, Curiosity will take several Navcam, Mastcam, and ChemCam observations to monitor the atmospheric composition and opacity and search for clouds.

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