Curiosity Front Hazcam Right B image taken on Sol 1810, September 8, 2017.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

Now in Sol 1811, the Curiosity Mars rover has wheeled up to the steepest part of Vera Rubin Ridge that it will encounter along its climb and has unobstructed views across the lowlands of Gale crater to the rear of the rover.

The scene is improving as the air becomes clearer heading into the colder seasons, reports Roger Wiens, a geochemist at the Los Alamos National Lab in New Mexico. He is the Principal Investigator for Curiosity’s Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instrument.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona

This Curiosity Navcam Right B image from Sol 1807 captures a cliff face just to the left of the rover. The image is tilted due to the to the unusually high 15.5 degree tilt of the rover as it climbs the ridge. Part of Mount Sharp is in the background.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

 

 

New map

Meanwhile, a new Curiosity traverse map through Sol 1809 has been issued showing the route driven by the rover since landing in August 2012.

Numbering of the dots along the line indicate the sol number of each drive. North is up. The scale bar is 1 kilometer (~0.62 mile).

From Sol 1807 to Sol 1809, Curiosity had driven a straight line distance of about 28.90 feet (8.81 meters), bringing the rover’s total odometry for the mission to 10.79 miles (17.36 kilometers).

Curiosity Rear Hazcam Right B image acquired on Sol 1810, September 8, 2017.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The base image from the map is from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment Camera (HiRISE) in NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

Curiosity Mastcam Right image taken on Sol 1809, September 7, 2017.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Curiosity Mastcam Left image acquired on Sol 1809, September 7, 2017.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

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