Curiosity Front Hazcam Right B image taken on Sol 1474, September 28, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Front Hazcam Right B image taken on Sol 1474, September 28, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Mars Curiosity Mars rover is just sliding into Sol 1475.

Word is that the roughly 53-feet (16-meter) drive on Sol 1473 was completed perfectly.

Curiosity is now in position for contact science on an outcrop of cross-bedded Murray bedrock.

Curiosity Navcam Right B image taken on Sol 1474, September 28, 2016. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Curiosity Navcam Right B image taken on Sol 1474, September 28, 2016.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech

Cross-bedding

The primary goal for Sol 1474 was to characterize the cross-bedding and measure grain sizes using the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) amongst a number of good observations.

Prior to the robot’s arm deployment, the Chemistry and Camera (ChemCam) instrument will measure the chemical composition of the “Kopong” bedrock target. Mastcam is to acquire mosaics of the Kopong outcrop and a couple of blocks behind it. And the rover’s Navcam will search for clouds, explains Ken Herkenhoff of the USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, Arizona.

“The arm activities start with a full suite of MAHLI images of Kopong and a MAHLI mosaic of the left side of the outcrop, dubbed “Utuseb,” Herkenhoff adds.

Brush off

Follow on activities scripted was the brush off of the “Jwaneng” target, with MAHLI images taken before and after the brushing.

Also on the duty list is for the rover’s Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument to be placed 0.5 centimeter from the center of the brushed spot for a short evening integration.

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover's robotic arm, on September 28, 2016, Sol 1474. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity acquired this image using its Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), located on the turret at the end of the rover’s robotic arm, on September 28, 2016, Sol 1474.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

APXS will then be moved to the center of the brushed spot for an overnight integration.

“Finding good contact science targets that could be safely brushed and imaged was a challenge,” but the tactical team did a great job added Herkenhoff.

Leave a Reply

Griffith Observatory Event