Inventor Dan Slater uses Remote Acoustic Sensor (RAS) technology during a test firing of the five-segment rocket motor headed for use on NASA’s Space Launch System booster. Credit: Sandy Slater

Inventor Dan Slater uses Remote Acoustic Sensor (RAS) technology during a test firing of the five-segment rocket motor headed for use on NASA’s Space Launch System booster.
Credit: Sandy Slater

A novel technique is being tested to visually and audio-record scenes ranging from exo-atmospheric rocket events to microbial life on other worlds.

Tagged as a Remote Acoustic Sensor (RAS), this new type of technology is suitable for use on rockets, spacecraft and other high-performance aerospace vehicles.

A ground based long range Remote Acoustic Sensor (RAS) telescope provided visual and aural views of the September 29, 2013 launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. This example shows main engine cutoff, stage separation and second stage engine start high above the Earth.  Credit: Dan Slater

A ground based long range Remote Acoustic Sensor (RAS) telescope provided visual and aural views of the September 29, 2013 launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. This example shows main engine cutoff, stage separation and second stage engine start high above the Earth.
Credit: Dan Slater

Yet another idea is a miniaturized version of the device that could find its way onto the surface of Mars or upon the frozen ice fields of Jupiter’s Europa – to eavesdrop for signs of life.

For details on this technology, go to my new Space.com story at:

Listening for Alien Life: Could New Tech Detect Microbe Movements? by Leonard David, Space.com’s Space Insider Columnist October 01, 2015 07:09am ET

http://www.space.com/30709-space-noise-sensor-alien-life.html

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